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Arabic goods on the Maritime Silk Road - Spices


Release time:

2011-07-26

Since the Tang Dynasty, the spices produced in Mulaha and Dhofar in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula have come to Guangzhou, Quanzhou, the southern port of China, along with merchant ships. At that time, the Arabs referred to Guangzhou as “Kangxi” and Quanzhou as “Zhatong City”.

 

The Arabian Peninsula has been closely associated with spices since ancient times and is known for its expertise in growing, producing and using spices. The so-called "fragrance" was actually used in a wide range of applications, such as medicine, makeup, lavender, and torch!

 

In 1973, a large sea-going vessel made by the Southern Song Dynasty, Fujian and Fujian, was excavated in the waters near Quanzhou, China. The materials contained in it were frankincense, myrrh, cinnamon, cloves and other Arabic spices. It can be seen that the spice occupied the position of Sino-African trade at that time. Since the Tang Dynasty, the spices produced in Mulaha and Dhofar in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula have come to Guangzhou, Quanzhou, the southern port of China, along with merchant ships. At that time, the Arabs referred to Guangzhou as “Kangxi” and Quanzhou as “Zhatong City”. Historians later called this sea passage between China and the Arabian Peninsula "the road to spice."

 

Cinnamon is an important trade item for Arab merchant ships in trade with China.

 

The Arabian Peninsula has been closely associated with spices since ancient times and is known for its expertise in growing, producing and using spices. The so-called "fragrance" was actually used in a wide range of applications, such as medicine, makeup, lavender, and torch.

 

In 1973, a large sea-going vessel made by the Southern Song Dynasty, Fujian and Fujian, was excavated in the waters near Quanzhou, China. The materials contained in it were frankincense, myrrh, cinnamon, cloves and other Arabic spices. It can be seen that the spice occupied the position of Sino-African trade at that time. Since the Tang Dynasty, the spices produced in Mulaha and Dhofar in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula have come to Guangzhou, Quanzhou, the southern port of China, along with merchant ships. At that time, the Arabs referred to Guangzhou as “Kangxi” and Quanzhou as “Zhatong City”. Historians later called this sea passage between China and the Arabian Peninsula "the road to spice."

 

Cinnamon is an important trade item for Arab merchant ships in trade with China.